Чтобы переварить знания, надо поглощать их с аппетитом.

А. Франс

Вариант 8

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Yesterday we discussed our plans for the party next week. Donna said that she would organise all the food and drinks and Jeff promised us that he (A1) … the music. After that, I explained that there was a problem with the room. The manager (A2) … me that the party (A3) … to end at 11 p. m. He (A4) … to cancel the party if I (A5) … . I explained to them that I (A6) … hard to make him change his mind and I promised to speak to him again about the matter. They said to me that they hoped I would succeed or the party (A7) … . I apologised for the problem and said that I would do my best.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Yesterday we discussed our plans for the party next week. Donna said that she would organise all the food and drinks and Jeff promised us that he (A1) … the music. After that, I explained that there was a problem with the room. The manager (A2) … me that the party (A3) … to end at 11 p. m. He (A4) … to cancel the party if I (A5) … . I explained to them that I (A6) … hard to make him change his mind and I promised to speak to him again about the matter. They said to me that they hoped I would succeed or the party (A7) … . I apologised for the problem and said that I would do my best.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Yesterday we discussed our plans for the party next week. Donna said that she would organise all the food and drinks and Jeff promised us that he (A1) … the music. After that, I explained that there was a problem with the room. The manager (A2) … me that the party (A3) … to end at 11 p. m. He (A4) … to cancel the party if I (A5) … . I explained to them that I (A6) … hard to make him change his mind and I promised to speak to him again about the matter. They said to me that they hoped I would succeed or the party (A7) … . I apologised for the problem and said that I would do my best.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Yesterday we discussed our plans for the party next week. Donna said that she would organise all the food and drinks and Jeff promised us that he (A1) … the music. After that, I explained that there was a problem with the room. The manager (A2) … me that the party (A3) … to end at 11 p. m. He (A4) … to cancel the party if I (A5) … . I explained to them that I (A6) … hard to make him change his mind and I promised to speak to him again about the matter. They said to me that they hoped I would succeed or the party (A7) … . I apologised for the problem and said that I would do my best.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Yesterday we discussed our plans for the party next week. Donna said that she would organise all the food and drinks and Jeff promised us that he (A1) … the music. After that, I explained that there was a problem with the room. The manager (A2) … me that the party (A3) … to end at 11 p. m. He (A4) … to cancel the party if I (A5) … . I explained to them that I (A6) … hard to make him change his mind and I promised to speak to him again about the matter. They said to me that they hoped I would succeed or the party (A7) … . I apologised for the problem and said that I would do my best.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Yesterday we discussed our plans for the party next week. Donna said that she would organise all the food and drinks and Jeff promised us that he (A1) … the music. After that, I explained that there was a problem with the room. The manager (A2) … me that the party (A3) … to end at 11 p. m. He (A4) … to cancel the party if I (A5) … . I explained to them that I (A6) … hard to make him change his mind and I promised to speak to him again about the matter. They said to me that they hoped I would succeed or the party (A7) … . I apologised for the problem and said that I would do my best.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Yesterday we discussed our plans for the party next week. Donna said that she would organise all the food and drinks and Jeff promised us that he (A1) … the music. After that, I explained that there was a problem with the room. The manager (A2) … me that the party (A3) … to end at 11 p. m. He (A4) … to cancel the party if I (A5) … . I explained to them that I (A6) … hard to make him change his mind and I promised to speak to him again about the matter. They said to me that they hoped I would succeed or the party (A7) … . I apologised for the problem and said that I would do my best.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Television has significantly affected the world of sport and the way that we get to enjoy it. In recent decades it has become virtually impossible to watch sport live on television without the constant interruption of replays. Any time a referee makes a slightly controversial decision, we are immediately shown (A8) … instant replay. We are so accustomed (A9) … this that if we don’t see the instant replay, we’re left with (A10) … suspicion that we’ve missed (A11) … on something important. Television has also been a major factor (A12) … making top professional sports people extremely wealthy. Leading figures in sports may enjoy enormous fame and popularity (A13) … a result of television coverage. Their fees may easily reach millions of pounds (A14) … a single TV commercial or magazine advertisement. Many consider these amounts scandalous, but others argue that TV sport is beneficial overall, because it provides encouragement (A15) … more people to take part in healthy activities.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Television has significantly affected the world of sport and the way that we get to enjoy it. In recent decades it has become virtually impossible to watch sport live on television without the constant interruption of replays. Any time a referee makes a slightly controversial decision, we are immediately shown (A8) … instant replay. We are so accustomed (A9) … this that if we don’t see the instant replay, we’re left with (A10) … suspicion that we’ve missed (A11) … on something important. Television has also been a major factor (A12) … making top professional sports people extremely wealthy. Leading figures in sports may enjoy enormous fame and popularity (A13) … a result of television coverage. Their fees may easily reach millions of pounds (A14) … a single TV commercial or magazine advertisement. Many consider these amounts scandalous, but others argue that TV sport is beneficial overall, because it provides encouragement (A15) … more people to take part in healthy activities.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Television has significantly affected the world of sport and the way that we get to enjoy it. In recent decades it has become virtually impossible to watch sport live on television without the constant interruption of replays. Any time a referee makes a slightly controversial decision, we are immediately shown (A8) … instant replay. We are so accustomed (A9) … this that if we don’t see the instant replay, we’re left with (A10) … suspicion that we’ve missed (A11) … on something important. Television has also been a major factor (A12) … making top professional sports people extremely wealthy. Leading figures in sports may enjoy enormous fame and popularity (A13) … a result of television coverage. Their fees may easily reach millions of pounds (A14) … a single TV commercial or magazine advertisement. Many consider these amounts scandalous, but others argue that TV sport is beneficial overall, because it provides encouragement (A15) … more people to take part in healthy activities.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Television has significantly affected the world of sport and the way that we get to enjoy it. In recent decades it has become virtually impossible to watch sport live on television without the constant interruption of replays. Any time a referee makes a slightly controversial decision, we are immediately shown (A8) … instant replay. We are so accustomed (A9) … this that if we don’t see the instant replay, we’re left with (A10) … suspicion that we’ve missed (A11) … on something important. Television has also been a major factor (A12) … making top professional sports people extremely wealthy. Leading figures in sports may enjoy enormous fame and popularity (A13) … a result of television coverage. Their fees may easily reach millions of pounds (A14) … a single TV commercial or magazine advertisement. Many consider these amounts scandalous, but others argue that TV sport is beneficial overall, because it provides encouragement (A15) … more people to take part in healthy activities.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Television has significantly affected the world of sport and the way that we get to enjoy it. In recent decades it has become virtually impossible to watch sport live on television without the constant interruption of replays. Any time a referee makes a slightly controversial decision, we are immediately shown (A8) … instant replay. We are so accustomed (A9) … this that if we don’t see the instant replay, we’re left with (A10) … suspicion that we’ve missed (A11) … on something important. Television has also been a major factor (A12) … making top professional sports people extremely wealthy. Leading figures in sports may enjoy enormous fame and popularity (A13) … a result of television coverage. Their fees may easily reach millions of pounds (A14) … a single TV commercial or magazine advertisement. Many consider these amounts scandalous, but others argue that TV sport is beneficial overall, because it provides encouragement (A15) … more people to take part in healthy activities.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Television has significantly affected the world of sport and the way that we get to enjoy it. In recent decades it has become virtually impossible to watch sport live on television without the constant interruption of replays. Any time a referee makes a slightly controversial decision, we are immediately shown (A8) … instant replay. We are so accustomed (A9) … this that if we don’t see the instant replay, we’re left with (A10) … suspicion that we’ve missed (A11) … on something important. Television has also been a major factor (A12) … making top professional sports people extremely wealthy. Leading figures in sports may enjoy enormous fame and popularity (A13) … a result of television coverage. Their fees may easily reach millions of pounds (A14) … a single TV commercial or magazine advertisement. Many consider these amounts scandalous, but others argue that TV sport is beneficial overall, because it provides encouragement (A15) … more people to take part in healthy activities.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Television has significantly affected the world of sport and the way that we get to enjoy it. In recent decades it has become virtually impossible to watch sport live on television without the constant interruption of replays. Any time a referee makes a slightly controversial decision, we are immediately shown (A8) … instant replay. We are so accustomed (A9) … this that if we don’t see the instant replay, we’re left with (A10) … suspicion that we’ve missed (A11) … on something important. Television has also been a major factor (A12) … making top professional sports people extremely wealthy. Leading figures in sports may enjoy enormous fame and popularity (A13) … a result of television coverage. Their fees may easily reach millions of pounds (A14) … a single TV commercial or magazine advertisement. Many consider these amounts scandalous, but others argue that TV sport is beneficial overall, because it provides encouragement (A15) … more people to take part in healthy activities.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Television has significantly affected the world of sport and the way that we get to enjoy it. In recent decades it has become virtually impossible to watch sport live on television without the constant interruption of replays. Any time a referee makes a slightly controversial decision, we are immediately shown (A8) … instant replay. We are so accustomed (A9) … this that if we don’t see the instant replay, we’re left with (A10) … suspicion that we’ve missed (A11) … on something important. Television has also been a major factor (A12) … making top professional sports people extremely wealthy. Leading figures in sports may enjoy enormous fame and popularity (A13) … a result of television coverage. Their fees may easily reach millions of pounds (A14) … a single TV commercial or magazine advertisement. Many consider these amounts scandalous, but others argue that TV sport is beneficial overall, because it provides encouragement (A15) … more people to take part in healthy activities.

Прочитайте предложение. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When I got to the station, … train had already left.

Прочитайте предложение. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

… I seem to have lost your phone number, I thought I’d better write you a quick note.

Прочитайте предложение. Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

What happened during the strike (1) were the result (2) of the management trying (3) to bring in new workers (4).

Прочитайте предложение. Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

After the failure (1), my sister encouraged me (2) how to try (3) once more (4).

Прочитайте предложение. Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

Their car cost (1) three times (2) as much more (3) as ours (4).

Прочитайте предложение. Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

I used to love (1) to visit Santorini (2) so much (3) that I finally bought a house there (4).

Прочитайте предложение. Укажите номер подчеркнутого фрагмента, в котором допущена ошибка.

Remember that everyone in the company (1) has (2) an important contribution (3) to take (4).

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When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

When Pamela Jarrett left university to become a (A23) … school teacher, it was by no (A24) … easy to find a job. She therefore decided to go abroad as a volunteer teacher for a year. When she realised she would be teaching deaf and blind children, she was a (A25) … taken aback. But after a month’s training she felt more confident that she would be able to cope with the situation. The basic living conditions also (A26) … as something of a shock. Pamela’s school was situated in a remote Ethiopian village, where her accommodation (A27) … of one room and a shared bathroom. Not only was the space cramped, but there was no electricity, Internet or telephone access, so she felt totally cut (A28) … from the outside world. Now back home in Britain, Pamela has used her valuable experience to set up a similar school. The specialised help she offers to the deaf and blind has made a huge (A29) … to dozens of children who would (A30) … find themselves struggling to learn. Pamela would certainly like to revisit Africa someday. At the moment, though, she is concentrating her efforts on (A31) … her school to cater for children with learning difficulties, too. It seems that the more people get to know her, the greater the (A32) … is for her skills.

Прочитайте диалог. Ответьте на вопрос, следующий после диалога, выбрав один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

Man: What does your horoscope say?

Woman: It says: “Those of you with a job which involves routine and steadiness should beware”.

What does the woman mean?

Выберите реплику-стимул, подходящую по смыслу к предложенной ответной реплике.

Not in the least.

Установите соответствие между репликами-стимулами 1—4 и ответными репликами A—E. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа. Одна ответная реплика (A—E) является лишней.

1. Would you like me to accompany you?
2. I hesitate to accept your offer.
3. I’ve made coffee for you.
4. What about visiting Kate tonight?

A. Please, don’t.
B. Sorry, I can’t.
C. Don’t. You won’t regret it.
D. Sure. No problem.
E. That’s very sweet of you.

Расположите реплики так, чтобы получился связный диалог. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

A. Okay. I see what you’re getting at. You want a rise!
B. Why, what’s the matter?
C. Well, Gary, things have been getting on top of me lately. You see, my youngest isn’t old enough to go to school yet and my husband has to work nights. So looking after the kids is a bit of a nightmare.
D. I’m sorry, Gary, but I’m going to have to work part time from now on.
E. But we can’t afford to have any loss in production. Can’t you pay a childminder to take care of them?
F. It’s all very well for you to say that, but how am I supposed to pay for one on my salary?

Прочитайте текст. Ответьте на вопрос. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

§ 1. The two months I spent at Newport with Aunt Eliza Huell, who had been sent to the seaside for the benefit of her health, were the months that created all that is dramatic in my life. My aunt was difficult, for she was not only out of health, but involved in a lawsuit. She wrote to me, for we lived apart, asking me to accompany her — not because she was fond of me, or wished to give me pleasure, but because I was useful in various ways. Mother insisted I go, because she thought it was wise to be nice to her. Aunt Eliza was rich, and we were poor.

§ 2. I gave my music pupils a longer and earlier holiday than usual, then started for New York. I arrived at her house in Bond Street at 7 a. m., and found her servant James talking to the milkman. He told me that Miss Huell was very bad, and that the housekeeper was still in bed. I supposed that Aunt Eliza was also in bed, but I had hardly entered the house when I heard her bell ring as only she could ring it — with an impatient jerk. “She wants hot milk” said James, “and the man has just come.”

§ 3. I laid my hat down, and went into the kitchen. Greeting the cook, who was an old friend, I took a pan, into which I poured some milk, and held it over the gas until it was hot; then I carried it up to Aunt Eliza. “Here’s your milk, Aunt Eliza. You have sent for me to help you, and I came at the earliest opportunity.” “I looked for you an hour ago. Ring the bell.” I rang it. “Your mother is well, I suppose. She would not have sent you, though, had she been sick in bed.”

§  4. The housekeeper, Mrs Roll, came in and Aunt Eliza politely requested her to get breakfast ready for her niece as soon as possible. “I do not go down in the mornings yet,” said Aunt Eliza, “but Mrs Roll is there. See that the coffee is good, Roll.” “It is good generally, Miss Huell.” “You see that Margaret brought me my milk.” “Hmm!” said Mrs Roll, marching out.

§5. At the beginning of each visit to Aunt Eliza I was in the habit of thinking about the difference between her living style and ours. We lived from ‘hand to mouth’. Everything about her wore a hereditary air; for she lived in my grandfather’s house and it was the same as in his day. If I was at home when these differences occurred to me, I should have felt angry; as it was, I felt them as in a dream — the china, the silver, the old furniture and the excellent food soothed me.

How did the two months with her aunt affect the narrator?

Прочитайте текст. Ответьте на вопрос. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

§ 1. The two months I spent at Newport with Aunt Eliza Huell, who had been sent to the seaside for the benefit of her health, were the months that created all that is dramatic in my life. My aunt was difficult, for she was not only out of health, but involved in a lawsuit. She wrote to me, for we lived apart, asking me to accompany her — not because she was fond of me, or wished to give me pleasure, but because I was useful in various ways. Mother insisted I go, because she thought it was wise to be nice to her. Aunt Eliza was rich, and we were poor.

§ 2. I gave my music pupils a longer and earlier holiday than usual, then started for New York. I arrived at her house in Bond Street at 7 a. m., and found her servant James talking to the milkman. He told me that Miss Huell was very bad, and that the housekeeper was still in bed. I supposed that Aunt Eliza was also in bed, but I had hardly entered the house when I heard her bell ring as only she could ring it — with an impatient jerk. “She wants hot milk” said James, “and the man has just come.”

§ 3. I laid my hat down, and went into the kitchen. Greeting the cook, who was an old friend, I took a pan, into which I poured some milk, and held it over the gas until it was hot; then I carried it up to Aunt Eliza. “Here’s your milk, Aunt Eliza. You have sent for me to help you, and I came at the earliest opportunity.” “I looked for you an hour ago. Ring the bell.” I rang it. “Your mother is well, I suppose. She would not have sent you, though, had she been sick in bed.”

§ 4. The housekeeper, Mrs Roll, came in and Aunt Eliza politely requested her to get breakfast ready for her niece as soon as possible. “I do not go down in the mornings yet,” said Aunt Eliza, “but Mrs Roll is there. See that the coffee is good, Roll.” “It is good generally, Miss Huell.” “You see that Margaret brought me my milk.” “Hmm!” said Mrs Roll, marching out.

§ 5. At the beginning of each visit to Aunt Eliza I was in the habit of thinking about the difference between her living style and ours. We lived from ‘hand to mouth’. Everything about her wore a hereditary air; for she lived in my grandfather’s house and it was the same as in his day. If I was at home when these differences occurred to me, I should have felt angry; as it was, I felt them as in a dream — the china, the silver, the old furniture and the excellent food soothed me.

What did the narrator think about staying with her aunt?

Прочитайте текст. Ответьте на вопрос. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

§ 1. The two months I spent at Newport with Aunt Eliza Huell, who had been sent to the seaside for the benefit of her health, were the months that created all that is dramatic in my life. My aunt was difficult, for she was not only out of health, but involved in a lawsuit. She wrote to me, for we lived apart, asking me to accompany her — not because she was fond of me, or wished to give me pleasure, but because I was useful in various ways. Mother insisted I go, because she thought it was wise to be nice to her. Aunt Eliza was rich, and we were poor.

§ 2. I gave my music pupils a longer and earlier holiday than usual, then started for New York. I arrived at her house in Bond Street at 7 a. m., and found her servant James talking to the milkman. He told me that Miss Huell was very bad, and that the housekeeper was still in bed. I supposed that Aunt Eliza was also in bed, but I had hardly entered the house when I heard her bell ring as only she could ring it — with an impatient jerk. “She wants hot milk” said James, “and the man has just come.”

§ 3. I laid my hat down, and went into the kitchen. Greeting the cook, who was an old friend, I took a pan, into which I poured some milk, and held it over the gas until it was hot; then I carried it up to Aunt Eliza. “Here’s your milk, Aunt Eliza. You have sent for me to help you, and I came at the earliest opportunity.” “I looked for you an hour ago. Ring the bell.” I rang it. “Your mother is well, I suppose. She would not have sent you, though, had she been sick in bed.”

§ 4. The housekeeper, Mrs Roll, came in and Aunt Eliza politely requested her to get breakfast ready for her niece as soon as possible. “I do not go down in the mornings yet,” said Aunt Eliza, “but Mrs Roll is there. See that the coffee is good, Roll.” “It is good generally, Miss Huell.” “You see that Margaret brought me my milk.” “Hmm!” said Mrs Roll, marching out.

§ 5. At the beginning of each visit to Aunt Eliza I was in the habit of thinking about the difference between her living style and ours. We lived from ‘hand to mouth’. Everything about her wore a hereditary air; for she lived in my grandfather’s house and it was the same as in his day. If I was at home when these differences occurred to me, I should have felt angry; as it was, I felt them as in a dream — the china, the silver, the old furniture and the excellent food soothed me.

What was her aunt’s reaction when the narrator took her her milk?

Прочитайте текст. Ответьте на вопрос. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

§ 1. The two months I spent at Newport with Aunt Eliza Huell, who had been sent to the seaside for the benefit of her health, were the months that created all that is dramatic in my life. My aunt was difficult, for she was not only out of health, but involved in a lawsuit. She wrote to me, for we lived apart, asking me to accompany her — not because she was fond of me, or wished to give me pleasure, but because I was useful in various ways. Mother insisted I go, because she thought it was wise to be nice to her. Aunt Eliza was rich, and we were poor.

§ 2. I gave my music pupils a longer and earlier holiday than usual, then started for New York. I arrived at her house in Bond Street at 7 a. m., and found her servant James talking to the milkman. He told me that Miss Huell was very bad, and that the housekeeper was still in bed. I supposed that Aunt Eliza was also in bed, but I had hardly entered the house when I heard her bell ring as only she could ring it — with an impatient jerk. “She wants hot milk” said James, “and the man has just come.”

§ 3. I laid my hat down, and went into the kitchen. Greeting the cook, who was an old friend, I took a pan, into which I poured some milk, and held it over the gas until it was hot; then I carried it up to Aunt Eliza. “Here’s your milk, Aunt Eliza. You have sent for me to help you, and 
I came at the earliest opportunity.” “I looked for you an hour ago. Ring the bell.” I rang it. “Your mother is well, I suppose. She would not have sent you, though, had she been sick in bed.”

§ 4. The housekeeper, Mrs Roll, came in and Aunt Eliza politely requested her to get breakfast ready for her niece as soon as possible. “I do not go down in the mornings yet,” said Aunt Eliza, “but Mrs Roll is there. See that the coffee is good, Roll.” “It is good generally, Miss Huell.” “You see that Margaret brought me my milk.” “Hmm!” said Mrs Roll, marching out.

§ 5. At the beginning of each visit to Aunt Eliza I was in the habit of thinking about the difference between her living style and ours. We lived from ‘hand to mouth’. Everything about her wore a hereditary air; for she lived in my grandfather’s house and it was the same as in his day. If I was at home when these differences occurred to me, I should have felt angry; as it was, I felt them as in a dream — the china, the silver, the old furniture and the excellent food soothed me.

What did the narrator think of her aunt’s lifestyle?

Прочитайте текст. Определите значение слова jerk (§ 2) в тексте. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

§ 1. The two months I spent at Newport with Aunt Eliza Huell, who had been sent to the seaside for the benefit of her health, were the months that created all that is dramatic in my life. My aunt was difficult, for she was not only out of health, but involved in a lawsuit. She wrote to me, for we lived apart, asking me to accompany her — not because she was fond of me, or wished to give me pleasure, but because I was useful in various ways. Mother insisted I go, because she thought it was wise to be nice to her. Aunt Eliza was rich, and we were poor.

§ 2. I gave my music pupils a longer and earlier holiday than usual, then started for New York. I arrived at her house in Bond Street at 7 a. m., and found her servant James talking to the milkman. He told me that Miss Huell was very bad, and that the housekeeper was still in bed. I supposed that Aunt Eliza was also in bed, but I had hardly entered the house when I heard her bell ring as only she could ring it — with an impatient jerk. “She wants hot milk” said James, “and the man has just come.”

§ 3. I laid my hat down, and went into the kitchen. Greeting the cook, who was an old friend, I took a pan, into which I poured some milk, and held it over the gas until it was hot; then I carried it up to Aunt Eliza. “Here’s your milk, Aunt Eliza. You have sent for me to help you, and I came at the earliest opportunity.” “I looked for you an hour ago. Ring the bell.” I rang it. “Your mother is well, I suppose. She would not have sent you, though, had she been sick in bed.”

§ 4. The housekeeper, Mrs Roll, came in and Aunt Eliza politely requested her to get breakfast ready for her niece as soon as possible. “I do not go down in the mornings yet,” said Aunt Eliza, “but Mrs Roll is there. See that the coffee is good, Roll.” “It is good generally, Miss Huell.” “You see that Margaret brought me my milk.” “Hmm!” said Mrs Roll, marching out.

§ 5. At the beginning of each visit to Aunt Eliza I was in the habit of thinking about the difference between her living style and ours. We lived from ‘hand to mouth’. Everything about her wore a hereditary air; for she lived in my grandfather’s house and it was the same as in his day. If I was at home when these differences occurred to me, I should have felt angry; as it was, I felt them as in a dream — the china, the silver, the old furniture and the excellent food soothed me.

Прочитайте текст. Определите значение слова hereditary (§ 5) в тексте. Выберите один из предложенных вариантов ответа.

§ 1. The two months I spent at Newport with Aunt Eliza Huell, who had been sent to the seaside for the benefit of her health, were the months that created all that is dramatic in my life. My aunt was difficult, for she was not only out of health, but involved in a lawsuit. She wrote to me, for we lived apart, asking me to accompany her — not because she was fond of me, or wished to give me pleasure, but because I was useful in various ways. Mother insisted I go, because she thought it was wise to be nice to her. Aunt Eliza was rich, and we were poor.

§ 2. I gave my music pupils a longer and earlier holiday than usual, then started for New York. I arrived at her house in Bond Street at 7 a. m., and found her servant James talking to the milkman. He told me that Miss Huell was very bad, and that the housekeeper was still in bed. I supposed that Aunt Eliza was also in bed, but I had hardly entered the house when I heard her bell ring as only she could ring it — with an impatient jerk. “She wants hot milk” said James, “and the man has just come.”

§ 3. I laid my hat down, and went into the kitchen. Greeting the cook, who was an old friend, I took a pan, into which I poured some milk, and held it over the gas until it was hot; then I carried it up to Aunt Eliza. “Here’s your milk, Aunt Eliza. You have sent for me to help you, and I came at the earliest opportunity.” “I looked for you an hour ago. Ring the bell.” I rang it. “Your mother is well, I suppose. She would not have sent you, though, had she been sick in bed.”

§ 4. The housekeeper, Mrs Roll, came in and Aunt Eliza politely requested her to get breakfast ready for her niece as soon as possible. “I do not go down in the mornings yet,” said Aunt Eliza, “but Mrs Roll is there. See that the coffee is good, Roll.” “It is good generally, Miss Huell.” “You see that Margaret brought me my milk.” “Hmm!” said Mrs Roll, marching out.

§ 5. At the beginning of each visit to Aunt Eliza I was in the habit of thinking about the difference between her living style and ours. We lived from ‘hand to mouth’. Everything about her wore a hereditary air; for she lived in my grandfather’s house and it was the same as in his day. If I was at home when these differences occurred to me, I should have felt angry; as it was, I felt them as in a dream — the china, the silver, the old furniture and the excellent food soothed me.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск A43 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1—4). Один фрагмент является лишним.

At the time, Operation Bumblebee seemed like another police publicity stunt. Even the slogans — ‘put the sting on burglars’ — seemed glib and unconvincing. (A43) ____ But more than a year later, it is beginning to look as if the Metropolitan Police may be making some headway against the flood of break-ins which had become virtually part of everyday life in the capital. Figures produced in the summer showed that the number of homes broken into between June and April had fallen by 16 per cent to 98,563. The number of burglaries where the culprit had been caught had risen from 11.7 per cent to 16.2 per cent. Still woefully high and woefully low respectively, but at last things seem to be moving in the right direction.

Translated into human terms, the figures mean that 1,500 fewer homes are burgled each month. Bumblebee was initially a local operation in certain parts of London where crime was at its worst. Partly propaganda — the public was urged to stop criminals by ‘buzzing the bee line’, it also saw the police going on the offensive with a series of spectacular mass raids on the homes of suspected burglars and fences. (A44) ____ In June last year, the new Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Paul Condon, announced that Bumblebee was going across the entire capital. The campaign, he said, was the police response to the public’s belief that burglary had become almost an epidemic. “London is fighting back,” he warned.

The massive raids continued, netting millions of pounds in stolen property and leading to hundreds of arrests. Yet the police believe that their quietly insistent message on crime prevention is what is making the largest contribution.

Scotland Yard estimates that a third of all burglaries are what they call a ‘walk-in’ job. A door or window is left unlocked or open and a passing thief grabs the opportunity. (A45) ____ Make sure that you don’t leave a ladder in the garden. Get decent locks on the doors and windows and an exterior light triggered by a movement sensor at the back of the house.

Scotland Yard has also gone to great lengths to improve its intelligence gathering. “The traditional gentleman burglar is a thing of the past,” says a spokesman. “Most are between 17 and 30 years old and living within three miles of their victims; 80 per cent of those we arrest are unemployed.”

(A46) ____ It may not be as dramatic (or exciting) as an armed robbery, but it has a corrosive effect on the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. Forensic science techniques previously reserved for major crimes are used whenever possible. (A47) ____ Previously many people might have felt that the police regarded a break-in as ‘just one of those things’. Millions of pounds in stolen property has been recovered (the rest has usually been sold in pubs and car boot sales). (A48) ____ In most cases, insurance has replaced what has been lost, and people cannot be bothered to attend. That is part of the modern culture of burglary, and most items will eventually be auctioned, with the proceeds going to the government.


1) A few simple steps could reduce the risk.

2) Londoners had seen it all before and knew anyway that Bumblebees are pretty harmless.

3) If you are prepared to invest several hundred pounds, fit a burglar alarm.

4) And, to many people’s surprise, it began to produce results.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск A44 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1—4). Один фрагмент является лишним.

At the time, Operation Bumblebee seemed like another police publicity stunt. Even the slogans — ‘put the sting on burglars’ — seemed glib and unconvincing. (A43) ____ But more than a year later, it is beginning to look as if the Metropolitan Police may be making some headway against the flood of break-ins which had become virtually part of everyday life in the capital. Figures produced in the summer showed that the number of homes broken into between June and April had fallen by 16 per cent to 98,563. The number of burglaries where the culprit had been caught had risen from 11.7 per cent to 16.2 per cent. Still woefully high and woefully low respectively, but at last things seem to be moving in the right direction.

Translated into human terms, the figures mean that 1,500 fewer homes are burgled each month. Bumblebee was initially a local operation in certain parts of London where crime was at its worst. Partly propaganda — the public was urged to stop criminals by ‘buzzing the bee line’, it also saw the police going on the offensive with a series of spectacular mass raids on the homes of suspected burglars and fences. (A44) ____ In June last year, the new Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Paul Condon, announced that Bumblebee was going across the entire capital. The campaign, he said, was the police response to the public’s belief that burglary had become almost an epidemic. “London is fighting back,” he warned.

The massive raids continued, netting millions of pounds in stolen property and leading to hundreds of arrests. Yet the police believe that their quietly insistent message on crime prevention is what is making the largest contribution.

Scotland Yard estimates that a third of all burglaries are what they call a ‘walk-in’ job. A door or window is left unlocked or open and a passing thief grabs the opportunity. (A45) ____ Make sure that you don’t leave a ladder in the garden. Get decent locks on the doors and windows and an exterior light triggered by a movement sensor at the back of the house.

Scotland Yard has also gone to great lengths to improve its intelligence gathering. “The traditional gentleman burglar is a thing of the past,” says a spokesman. “Most are between 17 and 30 years old and living within three miles of their victims; 80 per cent of those we arrest are unemployed.”

(A46) ____ It may not be as dramatic (or exciting) as an armed robbery, but it has a corrosive effect on the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. Forensic science techniques previously reserved for major crimes are used whenever possible. (A47) ____ Previously many people might have felt that the police regarded a break-in as ‘just one of those things’. Millions of pounds in stolen property has been recovered (the rest has usually been sold in pubs and car boot sales). (A48) ____ In most cases, insurance has replaced what has been lost, and people cannot be bothered to attend. That is part of the modern culture of burglary, and most items will eventually be auctioned, with the proceeds going to the government.


1) A few simple steps could reduce the risk.

2) Londoners had seen it all before and knew anyway that Bumblebees are pretty harmless.

3) If you are prepared to invest several hundred pounds, fit a burglar alarm.

4) And, to many people’s surprise, it began to produce results.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск A45 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1—4). Один фрагмент является лишним.

At the time, Operation Bumblebee seemed like another police publicity stunt. Even the slogans — ‘put the sting on burglars’ — seemed glib and unconvincing. (A43) ____ But more than a year later, it is beginning to look as if the Metropolitan Police may be making some headway against the flood of break-ins which had become virtually part of everyday life in the capital. Figures produced in the summer showed that the number of homes broken into between June and April had fallen by 16 per cent to 98,563. The number of burglaries where the culprit had been caught had risen from 11.7 per cent to 16.2 per cent. Still woefully high and woefully low respectively, but at last things seem to be moving in the right direction.

Translated into human terms, the figures mean that 1,500 fewer homes are burgled each month. Bumblebee was initially a local operation in certain parts of London where crime was at its worst. Partly propaganda — the public was urged to stop criminals by ‘buzzing the bee line’, it also saw the police going on the offensive with a series of spectacular mass raids on the homes of suspected burglars and fences. (A44) ____ In June last year, the new Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Paul Condon, announced that Bumblebee was going across the entire capital. The campaign, he said, was the police response to the public’s belief that burglary had become almost an epidemic. “London is fighting back,” he warned.

The massive raids continued, netting millions of pounds in stolen property and leading to hundreds of arrests. Yet the police believe that their quietly insistent message on crime prevention is what is making the largest contribution.

Scotland Yard estimates that a third of all burglaries are what they call a ‘walk-in’ job. A door or window is left unlocked or open and a passing thief grabs the opportunity. (A45) ____ Make sure that you don’t leave a ladder in the garden. Get decent locks on the doors and windows and an exterior light triggered by a movement sensor at the back of the house.

Scotland Yard has also gone to great lengths to improve its intelligence gathering. “The traditional gentleman burglar is a thing of the past,” says a spokesman. “Most are between 17 and 30 years old and living within three miles of their victims; 80 per cent of those we arrest are unemployed.”

(A46) ____ It may not be as dramatic (or exciting) as an armed robbery, but it has a corrosive effect on the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. Forensic science techniques previously reserved for major crimes are used whenever possible. (A47) ____ Previously many people might have felt that the police regarded a break-in as ‘just one of those things’. Millions of pounds in stolen property has been recovered (the rest has usually been sold in pubs and car boot sales). (A48) ____ In most cases, insurance has replaced what has been lost, and people cannot be bothered to attend. That is part of the modern culture of burglary, and most items will eventually be auctioned, with the proceeds going to the government.


1) A few simple steps could reduce the risk.

2) Londoners had seen it all before and knew anyway that Bumblebees are pretty harmless.

3) If you are prepared to invest several hundred pounds, fit a burglar alarm.

4) And, to many people’s surprise, it began to produce results.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск A46 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1—4). Один фрагмент является лишним.

At the time, Operation Bumblebee seemed like another police publicity stunt. Even the slogans — ‘put the sting on burglars’ — seemed glib and unconvincing. (A43) ____ But more than a year later, it is beginning to look as if the Metropolitan Police may be making some headway against the flood of break-ins which had become virtually part of everyday life in the capital. Figures produced in the summer showed that the number of homes broken into between June and April had fallen by 16 per cent to 98,563. The number of burglaries where the culprit had been caught had risen from 11.7 per cent to 16.2 per cent. Still woefully high and woefully low respectively, but at last things seem to be moving in the right direction.

Translated into human terms, the figures mean that 1,500 fewer homes are burgled each month. Bumblebee was initially a local operation in certain parts of London where crime was at its worst. Partly propaganda — the public was urged to stop criminals by ‘buzzing the bee line’, it also saw the police going on the offensive with a series of spectacular mass raids on the homes of suspected burglars and fences. (A44) ____ In June last year, the new Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Paul Condon, announced that Bumblebee was going across the entire capital. The campaign, he said, was the police response to the public’s belief that burglary had become almost an epidemic. “London is fighting back,” he warned.

The massive raids continued, netting millions of pounds in stolen property and leading to hundreds of arrests. Yet the police believe that their quietly insistent message on crime prevention is what is making the largest contribution.

Scotland Yard estimates that a third of all burglaries are what they call a ‘walk-in’ job. A door or window is left unlocked or open and a passing thief grabs the opportunity. (A45) ____ Make sure that you don’t leave a ladder in the garden. Get decent locks on the doors and windows and an exterior light triggered by a movement sensor at the back of the house.

Scotland Yard has also gone to great lengths to improve its intelligence gathering. “The traditional gentleman burglar is a thing of the past,” says a spokesman. “Most are between 17 and 30 years old and living within three miles of their victims; 80 per cent of those we arrest are unemployed.”

(A46) ____ It may not be as dramatic (or exciting) as an armed robbery, but it has a corrosive effect on the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. Forensic science techniques previously reserved for major crimes are used whenever possible. (A47) ____ Previously many people might have felt that the police regarded a break-in as ‘just one of those things’. Millions of pounds in stolen property has been recovered (the rest has usually been sold in pubs and car boot sales). (A48) ____ In most cases, insurance has replaced what has been lost, and people cannot be bothered to attend. That is part of the modern culture of burglary, and most items will eventually be auctioned, with the proceeds going to the government.


1) Householders can now expect a visit from a finger-print expert as a matter of routine.

2) Glass-break sensors monitor windows and activate the alarm by sensing the sound or vibration of broken glass.

3) Bumblebee also recognises what most people have felt for years, that burglary is the crime which most people fear.

4) So great is the volume, that the police have set up road shows where victims can search for their property.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск A47 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1—4). Один фрагмент является лишним.

At the time, Operation Bumblebee seemed like another police publicity stunt. Even the slogans — ‘put the sting on burglars’ — seemed glib and unconvincing. (A43) ____ But more than a year later, it is beginning to look as if the Metropolitan Police may be making some headway against the flood of break-ins which had become virtually part of everyday life in the capital. Figures produced in the summer showed that the number of homes broken into between June and April had fallen by 16 per cent to 98,563. The number of burglaries where the culprit had been caught had risen from 11.7 per cent to 16.2 per cent. Still woefully high and woefully low respectively, but at last things seem to be moving in the right direction.

Translated into human terms, the figures mean that 1,500 fewer homes are burgled each month. Bumblebee was initially a local operation in certain parts of London where crime was at its worst. Partly propaganda — the public was urged to stop criminals by ‘buzzing the bee line’, it also saw the police going on the offensive with a series of spectacular mass raids on the homes of suspected burglars and fences. (A44) ____ In June last year, the new Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Paul Condon, announced that Bumblebee was going across the entire capital. The campaign, he said, was the police response to the public’s belief that burglary had become almost an epidemic. “London is fighting back,” he warned.

The massive raids continued, netting millions of pounds in stolen property and leading to hundreds of arrests. Yet the police believe that their quietly insistent message on crime prevention is what is making the largest contribution.

Scotland Yard estimates that a third of all burglaries are what they call a ‘walk-in’ job. A door or window is left unlocked or open and a passing thief grabs the opportunity. (A45) ____ Make sure that you don’t leave a ladder in the garden. Get decent locks on the doors and windows and an exterior light triggered by a movement sensor at the back of the house.

Scotland Yard has also gone to great lengths to improve its intelligence gathering. “The traditional gentleman burglar is a thing of the past,” says a spokesman. “Most are between 17 and 30 years old and living within three miles of their victims; 80 per cent of those we arrest are unemployed.”

(A46) ____ It may not be as dramatic (or exciting) as an armed robbery, but it has a corrosive effect on the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. Forensic science techniques previously reserved for major crimes are used whenever possible. (A47) ____ Previously many people might have felt that the police regarded a break-in as ‘just one of those things’. Millions of pounds in stolen property has been recovered (the rest has usually been sold in pubs and car boot sales). (A48) ____ In most cases, insurance has replaced what has been lost, and people cannot be bothered to attend. That is part of the modern culture of burglary, and most items will eventually be auctioned, with the proceeds going to the government.


1) Householders can now expect a visit from a finger-print expert as a matter of routine.

2) Glass-break sensors monitor windows and activate the alarm by sensing the sound or vibration of broken glass.

3) Bumblebee also recognises what most people have felt for years, that burglary is the crime which most people fear.

4) So great is the volume, that the police have set up road shows where victims can search for their property.

Прочитайте текст. Заполните пропуск A48 одним из предложенных текстовых фрагментов (1—4). Один фрагмент является лишним.

At the time, Operation Bumblebee seemed like another police publicity stunt. Even the slogans — ‘put the sting on burglars’ — seemed glib and unconvincing. (A43) ____ But more than a year later, it is beginning to look as if the Metropolitan Police may be making some headway against the flood of break-ins which had become virtually part of everyday life in the capital. Figures produced in the summer showed that the number of homes broken into between June and April had fallen by 16 per cent to 98,563. The number of burglaries where the culprit had been caught had risen from 11.7 per cent to 16.2 per cent. Still woefully high and woefully low respectively, but at last things seem to be moving in the right direction.

Translated into human terms, the figures mean that 1,500 fewer homes are burgled each month. Bumblebee was initially a local operation in certain parts of London where crime was at its worst. Partly propaganda — the public was urged to stop criminals by ‘buzzing the bee line’, it also saw the police going on the offensive with a series of spectacular mass raids on the homes of suspected burglars and fences. (A44) ____ In June last year, the new Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Paul Condon, announced that Bumblebee was going across the entire capital. The campaign, he said, was the police response to the public’s belief that burglary had become almost an epidemic. “London is fighting back,” he warned.

The massive raids continued, netting millions of pounds in stolen property and leading to hundreds of arrests. Yet the police believe that their quietly insistent message on crime prevention is what is making the largest contribution.

Scotland Yard estimates that a third of all burglaries are what they call a ‘walk-in’ job. A door or window is left unlocked or open and a passing thief grabs the opportunity. (A45) ____ Make sure that you don’t leave a ladder in the garden. Get decent locks on the doors and windows and an exterior light triggered by a movement sensor at the back of the house.

Scotland Yard has also gone to great lengths to improve its intelligence gathering. “The traditional gentleman burglar is a thing of the past,” says a spokesman. “Most are between 17 and 30 years old and living within three miles of their victims; 80 per cent of those we arrest are unemployed.”

(A46) ____ It may not be as dramatic (or exciting) as an armed robbery, but it has a corrosive effect on the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. Forensic science techniques previously reserved for major crimes are used whenever possible. (A47) ____ Previously many people might have felt that the police regarded a break-in as ‘just one of those things’. Millions of pounds in stolen property has been recovered (the rest has usually been sold in pubs and car boot sales). (A48) ____ In most cases, insurance has replaced what has been lost, and people cannot be bothered to attend. That is part of the modern culture of burglary, and most items will eventually be auctioned, with the proceeds going to the government.


1) Householders can now expect a visit from a finger-print expert as a matter of routine.

2) Glass-break sensors monitor windows and activate the alarm by sensing the sound or vibration of broken glass.

3) Bumblebee also recognises what most people have felt for years, that burglary is the crime which most people fear.

4) So great is the volume, that the police have set up road shows where victims can search for their property.

Прочитайте текст. Выберите подходящее слово из предложенных и запишите его в той форме, в которой оно должно стоять в предложении. Помните, что каждое слово может быть использовано только один раз и что заданную форму слова необходимо изменить.

LOVE, TECHNOLOGY, ATTRACT, CARE

With the latest (B1) … advances and a little (B2) … care there’s no reason why you shouldn’t have (B3) …, healthy teeth for life. All you need to do is follow these simple guidelines (B4) … .

Прочитайте текст. Выберите подходящее слово из предложенных и запишите его в той форме, в которой оно должно стоять в предложении. Помните, что каждое слово может быть использовано только один раз и что заданную форму слова необходимо изменить.

LOVE, TECHNOLOGY, ATTRACT, CARE

With the latest (B1) … advances and a little (B2) … care there’s no reason why you shouldn’t have (B3) …, healthy teeth for life. All you need to do is follow these simple guidelines (B4) … .

Прочитайте текст. Выберите подходящее слово из предложенных и запишите его в той форме, в которой оно должно стоять в предложении. Помните, что каждое слово может быть использовано только один раз и что заданную форму слова необходимо изменить.

LOVE, TECHNOLOGY, ATTRACT, CARE

With the latest (B1) … advances and a little (B2) … care there’s no reason why you shouldn’t have (B3) …, healthy teeth for life. All you need to do is follow these simple guidelines (B4) … .

Прочитайте текст. Выберите подходящее слово из предложенных и запишите его в той форме, в которой оно должно стоять в предложении. Помните, что каждое слово может быть использовано только один раз и что заданную форму слова необходимо изменить.

LOVE, TECHNOLOGY, ATTRACT, CARE

With the latest (B1) … advances and a little (B2) … care there’s no reason why you shouldn’t have (B3) …, healthy teeth for life. All you need to do is follow these simple guidelines (B4) … .

Прочитайте текст. Заполните каждый из пропусков только одним словом, подходящим по смыслу. Слово должно содержать не более 15 символов.

Organising a dinner party can be a stressful business. Firstly you have to decide (B5) … you are going to invite and make (B6) … the guests are going to mix well. It’s (B7) … good inviting people that are either going to sit around in small groups and only speak to each other or people that are going to hide behind the furniture and not talk at (B8) … .

Прочитайте текст. Заполните каждый из пропусков только одним словом, подходящим по смыслу. Слово должно содержать не более 15 символов.

Organising a dinner party can be a stressful business. Firstly you have to decide (B5) … you are going to invite and make (B6) … the guests are going to mix well. It’s (B7) … good inviting people that are either going to sit around in small groups and only speak to each other or people that are going to hide behind the furniture and not talk at (B8) … .

Прочитайте текст. Заполните каждый из пропусков только одним словом, подходящим по смыслу. Слово должно содержать не более 15 символов.

Organising a dinner party can be a stressful business. Firstly you have to decide (B5) … you are going to invite and make (B6) … the guests are going to mix well. It’s (B7) … good inviting people that are either going to sit around in small groups and only speak to each other or people that are going to hide behind the furniture and not talk at (B8) … .

Прочитайте текст. Заполните каждый из пропусков только одним словом, подходящим по смыслу. Слово должно содержать не более 15 символов.

Organising a dinner party can be a stressful business. Firstly you have to decide (B5) … you are going to invite and make (B6) … the guests are going to mix well. It’s (B7) … good inviting people that are either going to sit around in small groups and only speak to each other or people that are going to hide behind the furniture and not talk at (B8) … .

Прочитайте текст. Найдите два лишних слова в тексте.

St Lucia has always been one of my all-time favourite holiday destinations. I first discovered its dramatic scenery on my honeymoon before twelve years ago and have been back such many times since.

Прочитайте текст. Найдите два лишних слова в тексте.

I generally stay in the north of the island at where there are many well-equipped villas situated in acres of private tropical grounds along stretches of white sandy beaches. The food is excellent too, and combining traditional local cooking with European sophistication.

Переведите на английский язык фрагмент предложения, данный в скобках.

They’ve made two CDs and I’ve got (оба) them — they’re great.

Переведите на английский язык фрагмент предложения, данный в скобках.

Natalie rarely eats pizza, (не так ли)?